People Underestimate The Complexity Of Keeping Captive Birds Which Leads To Failure

People Underestimate The Complexity Of Keeping Captive Birds Which Leads To Failure

Mitch..thanks so much for the great article on parrot ownership!! I’ve had birds for over 35 years and also volunteered at a parrot rescue.

Periodically I would do a TV appearance with a couple of our birds. Like you, I was honest..they are noisy, they bite (the little Severe Macaw I had with me obligingly bit the host right on cue) and they are messy.

Boy did I get reamed the next day by the assistant director! “We have to get these guys adopted!” she shrilled.

Here was a shelter person who literally wanted me to gloss over the very real aspects of having a bird for a lifetime..when we had thirty waiting for new homes because people weren’t prepared for the reality!

I am very appreciative when educators are forthcoming about the pros and CONS of becoming a bird’s special caregiver. thanks a million for the post!

Val T

You’re welcome Val. I think the biggest problem is people underestimate the complexity of keeping captive birds.  

Then they panic and try to re-home the bird or hopefully while wildly searching for answers with the screaming bird in the background, they find us.

I recently saw my doctor who I hadn’t seen in far too long because of the out-of-pocket costs.

Having recently enrolled in Medicare I should theoretically pay nothing with my supplemental Medicare insurance plan.

I’ve been fortunate enough to have this doctor for 15 years. Whatever is broken on me, he always fixes it the first time.

The longer we’ve had our relationship the easier it is for him to diagnose my problems because he has 15 years of insights to my medical history.

I like him, he sincere, quite smart, sincere, good looking and articulate. Occasionally I bring him gifts.

The last one was a couple of bags of black bean pasta low on carbohydrates for diabetics like me.

On the most recent visit I made a framed 8×11 poster that said “Don’t mistake your Google searches for my medical degree. Krister Johansson, MD.”

That’s where we run into problems. Assuming information found through Google searching and Facebook bird groups is accurate.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3VkcJm5mJ4Q

The disinformation about keeping birds as pets is monumental. The goal of our birdie brunch is to bring rational thought to bird keeping in the 21st century.

We have a unique perspective with millions of visitors having navigated our website over 15 years and interacting with hundreds if not thousands of captive bird owners on a monthly basis via every digital channel you can imagine.

If you can believe it we help people in person at the Birdie Boutique

Full transparency: yes we want to sell you stuff for your bird(s). We also want to take the frustration and fear out of the equation.

We help you understand the specifics of your species and what unique food, toys, accessories and placement of said items in your birdcage.

In other words we try to help you help yourself

I like to say “we are where the rubber meets the road” when it comes to The bird care. It’s a small niche but somebody has to do it.

Fact checking and creating original content about bird and parrot care along with working with my beautiful pink haired wife all day isn’t a bad gig – if you can get the work:-)

best mitchr
approved by catherine tobsing

your zygodactyl footnote
pigeon jumping off balcony rail saying "goodbye cruel world"

 

Mitch Rezman

He's handled a 1000 birds of numerous species when they visited monthly birdie brunches in the old Portage Park (Chicago, IL) facility. The one with the parrot playground. Mitch has written and published more than 1100 articles on captive bird care. He's met with the majority of  CEO's and business owners for most brands in the pet bird space and does so on a regular basis. He also constantly interacts with avian veterinarians and influencers globally.

This Post Has 4 Comments

  1. I wanted an umbrella cockatoo from the time I was 16. A guy at the Renaissance Faire where I lived and traveled with had one. During set up he was under a large beam that started to fall. The bird screamed causing him to look up and saved his life. But as I was moving around and not really ready I did not get one. A friend gave me his Nanday that he couldn’t manage so I had an idea what it was like. When I bought my house 20 years ago I found a large iron bird cage in the back yard. And a bird store down the street. With 2 newly hatched umbrellas. It was a sign. Over the years since it hasn’t always been easy. But I would never give her up. I’ve learned a lot. Your site always provides good information. People always tell me how beautiful she is and they want one. I assure them they probably do not. They are not pets. They are complex still wild animals. But you are totally correct. Not everyone os or ever will be ready to care for one for 60 plus years.

  2. I wanted an umbrella cockatoo from the time I was 16. A guy at the Renaissance Faire where I lived and traveled with had one. During set up he was under a large beam that started to fall. The bird screamed causing him to look up and saved his life. But as I was moving around and not really ready I did not get one. A friend gave me his Nanday that he couldn’t manage so I had an idea what it was like. When I bought my house 20 years ago I found a large iron bird cage in the back yard. And a bird store down the street. With 2 newly hatched umbrellas. It was a sign. Over the years since it hasn’t always been easy. But I would never give her up. I’ve learned a lot. Your site always provides good information. People always tell me how beautiful she is and they want one. I assure them they probably do not. They are not pets. They are complex still wild animals. But you are totally correct. Not everyone os or ever will be ready to care for one for 60 plus years.

  3. As usual, you’re exactly right! I love my three birds (Meyers, A.Grey, and BF Amazon) but they are complex, demanding, and sometimes a lot of work. I would rather people know that about them, then get one and be miserable (and the bird too).

  4. As usual, you’re exactly right! I love my three birds (Meyers, A.Grey, and BF Amazon) but they are complex, demanding, and sometimes a lot of work. I would rather people know that about them, then get one and be miserable (and the bird too).

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